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Funded Projects 2015

Project Lead:
Universität Bern

Investment is an important driver of the global economy that has endogenous relations with trade, and an indirect impact on other fields like, development, environment, labour mobility and taxation. The global investment regime itself is governed through overlapping fora of intergovernmental treaties, which has led to a fragmentation. Today, there are some 3,000 bilateral investment treaties in place. This project will create a new database in one single format and standardised language of investment treaties, including texts of bilateral investment treaties, the relevant parts of preferential trade agreements, the General Agreement on Trade in Services and double taxation agreements. 

Starting
Project Lead:
Universität Zürich

This project will carry out a comparative enquiry into racial segregation and illegalisation in European agro-industrial labour markets. It focuses on five case studies located in Italy and Switzerland, complemented with prospective research in the Benelux. The comparative ethnographic analysis of migrant employment regimes will contribute towards a better understanding of the differential exploitation of migrant workers in competitive agri-food chains, aiming to develop a framework for more sustainable production regimes and to improve difficult working conditions of migrants in agriculture.

Starting
Project Lead:
Université de Genève

Classical monitoring tools based on morphological species identification do not satisfy the growing demand for measuring the status of the current marine biodiversity. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, such as the metabarcoding approach, could overcome these limitations. This projects aims at exploring the potential utility of the metabarcoding approach for environmental monitoring of marine ecosystems from biological, legal and economic perspectives. The research outcome will provide information to policymakers and stakeholders for future decisions on the monitoring and protection of the marine environment.

Starting
Project Lead:
Universität St. Gallen

Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States are countries that not only account for a noteworthy share of global emissions but also will have to make significant contributions to tackling climate change that may help realise an effective global climate deal. This research will explore which types of intertemporal cost distributions are likely to find majority support in industrialised emitter countries. The insights gained will generate scientific knowledge that will enable policymakers to design climate policies that are more likely to be politically acceptable in major emitter countries. 

Starting
Project Lead:
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Gèneve, IHEID

Social and Solidarity Economic (SSE) practices are receiving growing attention by scholars and by public authorities. This increasing interest however, remains gender blind, even though these practices are highly gendered and women play a major role in them. This research project aims at addressing these gaps in SSE analysis and policies from a feminist perspective.

Starting
Project Lead:
Universität Basel

There is great concern that rapidly spreading pyrethroid resistance of Anopheles mosquitoes may nullify recent successes in the fight against malaria with insecticide treated nets (ITNs). Further, there is emerging evidence that insecticide-resistant Anopheles might be more susceptible to Plasmodium infection than insecticide-susceptible Anopheles, which could set back malaria control even further. The project seeks to analyse the magnitude of this phenomenon in three localities in Western Africa. The research outcome is expected to provide recommendations about the use of insecticide-treated bed nets and how to reduce the risk of a major crisis in the malaria control. 

Starting
Project Lead:
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Gèneve, IHEID

As shown in the recent Ebola outbreak, the increase of actors and funding in global health has not translated into sustainable health systems, effective governance, or decisive global health leadership. The proliferation of actors and institutions has led to fragmentation, competition and - in a word – “gridlock” in global health governance. This research seeks to operationalise the concept of gridlock to account for the deficiencies in global health governance. The comparative analysis will allow to understand the factors that lead to gridlock in global health governance and provide pathways of how to break the impasse.  

Starting
Project Lead:
Université de Neuchâtel

The research will examine the attitude of individuals towards immigrants over time. The study will focus on three research areas to define the impact of neighbourhoods, socialisation and the persistence of attitudes over time. The results are expected to contribute to debates on immigration and on how the social impact in receiving countries can be managed.

Starting